Category Archives: MBA Essay Resources

‘Seven Habits’ of Highly Successful MBA Applicants

Motivational guru Stephen Covey wrote ‘The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People’ which sold over 20 million copies in 40 languages. The book has critics but obviously also rings true for many. Anyway, the concept “seven habits” is synonymous with success, so I post my “Seven Habits” of Highly Effective MBA Applicants:

Habit 1. Know yourself. Self-knowledge, particularly in this case knowledge of the parts of yourself that count for MBA admissions—and being able to find these attributes in your profile—is the core of MBA admissions success.

Habit 2. Be yourself. If you don’t apply as “you,” you lose the authentic power of your own voice. Many applicants try to apply as someone else, or the “ideal” applicant. Being dinged for being you is hard. Being dinged for being someone else is pathetic.

Habit 3. Gain and demonstrate experience. Successful applicants have sought out many work and life significant experiences You don’t need to have traveled to the International Space Station to have had a significant experience. You just need to have taken the life chances that came your way, and be able to talk intelligently about them.

Habit 4. Develop and demonstrate character. Experiences, particularly challenging ones, create character. Good character is not just good ethics. It is the fully rounded resource base for individual decision-making and action that leads to positive choices for the individual and those around him/her.

Habit 5. Assume and demonstrate seniority. Successful applicants have reached for opportunities to become senior in their spheres of activity. Seniority is not a job type or a salary level; it is any position that implies responsibility, influence, and leadership of others.

Habit 6. Be bigger than you. Successful MBA applicants have walked the walk of doing something that is not entirely self-oriented. As I’ve written elsewhere, you don’t have to have fed the starving in Ethiopia: almost any form of unpaid community involvement counts.

Habit 7. Simplify. Push yourself to know what’s really important to say in your application, and say only that. Don’t throw everything at Adcom and hope something sticks.

Habit 7+1. Covey added an eighth habit, see below. My eighth is: A touch of class. You don’t need to listen to Dvorak while pruning your bonsai and sipping chai tea (see Habit 2.) But if your favorite book is Harry Potter and your favorite show is Love Island and you spend a lot of time on your sun tan… while there’s nothing technically wrong with this, you leave your competitors a plenty of room to beat you.

For the record, these are Covey’s seven: Be proactive. Begin with the end in mind. Put first things first. Think win-win. Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Synergise: learn to work with others to the benefit of all parties. Sharpen the saw: keep yourself physically, mentally and spiritually refreshed through such things as exercise, reading, prayer and good works. He later added the eighth: find your voice and inspire others to find theirs.

Good Sentences Are ‘The Bones’ Of A Good MBA Admissions Essay

Below are extracts from a useful article about how to write a good sentence. This has implications for MBA applicants and MBA admissions essay writers, because good sentences are the bones of a good application essay.

You don’t need to write beautiful, poetic prose to get into business school. But clean sentences that clearly carry your meaning gets your admissions value across more compellingly, with less lost in the fuzz and crackle of word noise. Also, as say and keep on saying, cutting wasted words and empty phrases leaves you more space for content that matters.

Here are some highlights:

Clarity

“The sentence is the Ur-unit, the core material, the granular element that must be got right or nothing will be right.

“What can celebrated writers teach the rest of us about the art of writing a great sentence? A common piece of writing advice is to make your sentences plain, unadorned and invisible. For James Baldwin, the only goal was “to write a sentence as clean as a bone”.

“George Orwell gave this piece of advice its epigram: Good prose is like a windowpane. A reader should notice the words no more than someone looking through glass notices the glass.

Form matters

“The word ‘sentence’ comes from the Latin sentire, to feel. A sentence must be felt by the reader, and a feeling is something that grows and fades like anything else that is alive.

“Rookie sentence-writers are often too busy worrying about the something they are trying to say and don’t worry enough about how that something looks and sounds. They look straight past the words into the meaning that they have strong-armed into them. They fasten on content and forget about form – forgetting that content and form are the same thing, that what a sentence says is the same as how it says it.

Dare to bare

“Sentences have become less shackled to each other. Those written a few hundred years ago typically began with a whereof or a howsobeit, to resume an unfinished thought. And they used lots of conjunctive adverbs, those connecting words like moreover, namely and indeed. Such adverbs are in historical retreat.

Think like a reader

“A good lesson for any writer: make each sentence worth reading.”

Full article here.